Bearing the fruits of labour

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(This last track will forever be the fruit trail for me because dam there was a lot of fruit. These are all the ones I gathered on trail.)
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The funniest thing happened to me on this last trail. There was a sign warning about me about only undertaking this track if you are an experienced hiker. This made me stop and think am I experienced?
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Well after five months of making mistakes and plenty of pain and suffering I am beginning to feel like maybe I am. Don’t get me wrong the track was steep but it was well formed, with both shoes and a rebalanced pack frame I even started to look the part.
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You see you don’t notice your fitness until you leave an hour after the last people and catch them. Or how organised your pack is until you see how quickly you can unpack and repack in under 15 minutes. The most notably change has been people saying “is that all your carrying?” Instead of “what are you carrying?”.
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I have no pain at the end of the day and know exactly how I need to eat to feel satisfied though I did run out of pemmican sadly. And at a glance of a map I know exactly how much ground I can cover in a day.
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I don’t think these are skills you will loose either (well maybe the fitness). I think I’m really going to appreciate a weekend in the bush a lot more knowing how much harder it is to be on the trail for five months.
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So when people ask what I am going to do once I finish this walk the answer will probably be more of the same. Walking, making and writing cos it’s pretty amazing….Probably to a lesser extent though.
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8 thoughts on “Bearing the fruits of labour

  1. Hey Jory
    We met briefly at Boyle Village. I was the other guy with homemade stuff. It’s a shame we didn’t compare our creations!

    I’ve enjoyed reading about your hike and your progression to this point. You’ve got some big balls man, kudos for trying something and sticking with it. It seems like you’ve really settled into it and got it down.

    The lifestyle is definitely addicting. I’d recommend checking out the PCT!
    Oh and if you’re passing through ChCh drop me a line

    Keep killing it
    Cam

  2. Kia ora e hoa, he tino pai tāu haerenga; ka nui te mihi. Ko Regan au, ko Ngāi Te Rangi te iwi; he kaiako māori au ki Ōtautahi Christchurch. Your journey sounds pai rawa, it’d be awesome to have a kōrero if you’re heading back through Christchurch on your way back up and we always have space to stay at our flat if needed too – just let me know if you’re keen. stokes.regan@gmail.com / 0273442474 mā te wā!

    • Tena koe e hoa. Kua hoki ahau kia Poneke kee!. Sorry I missed you I did pop into Chch last week on my way home. I am currently making improvements on my gear for future hikes so I will keep you in mind if I end up in your neck of the woods! Kia Ora ano

      • Pai tēnā e hoa, no worries. I’m keen to start learning about how to make traditional māori tools and the tikanga that goes with their creation; I’ve found a few resources but none really seem to go over the tikanga/karakia involved so would be keen to hear your whakaaro since you’re obviously adept already! Feel free to flick me an email if you like, ko stokes.regan@gmail.com tāku īmera

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